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RSG with DREAM 2019 | November 4-6, 2019 | New York, USA | Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speakers



Alexis Battle, PhD
John Hopkins Biomedical Engineering
Elodie Ghedin, PhD
New York University
Joakim Lundeberg, PhD
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Christopher E. Mason, PhD
Weill Cornell Medicine
Sohrab Shah, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Chris Wiggins, PhD
Columbia University
Peng Yin, PhD
Wyss Institute at Harvard University
   

Elodie Ghedin, PhD
New York University

Elodie Ghedin, PhD is Director of the Center for Genomics and Systems Biology at New York University, and Professor of Biology and Global Public Health. Her laboratory uses comparative genomics, evolutionary biology, and systems biology techniques to generate critical insight about host-pathogen interactions. Prof. Ghedin’s research program meets at the interface of molecular parasitology, microbiology, and genomics and focuses on the molecular basis of macroparasite (nematode) adaptation to niches in their human hosts, and microparasite (virus and bacteria) diversity and interaction in transmission and virulence.

Prof. Ghedin received her BS in Biology and PhD in Molecular Parasitology from McGill University (Montreal, Canada). She was named a MacArthur Foundation Fellow (2011), A Kavli Frontier of Science Fellow (2012), and an American Academy of Microbiology Fellow
(2017).

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Joakim Lundeberg, PhD
KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Professor Joakim Lundeberg heads the Department of Gene Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and focus on molecular technology development. His research group is since May 2010 located at the Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab), a national center for molecular biosciences with focus on health and environmental research. The center combines frontline technical expertise with advanced knowledge of translational medicine and molecular bioscience. The current research focus of JL relates to spatially resolved gene expression studies in situ, Spatial Transcriptomics. RNA-sequencing offers the possibility to analyze the expression of all genes in a sample. However, the spatial information of gene expression is lost. In the pioneering work a method was described that allowed studies of gene expression in tissue sections using RNA-sequencing to uncover transcriptional patterns in situ (Ståhl et al, Science, 2016). The basic concept is remarkably simple; by placing tissue sections on arrayed reverse transcription oligonucleotides with positional barcodes, cDNA for RNA-sequencing can be generated with maintained positional information within the tissue. The quality of the obtained cDNA libraries is as high as with the best protocols for homogenized tissue. Applying this strategy has been demonstrated to work remarkably well and allows visualizing and quantifying the transcriptome in regular histological tissue sections, i.e. tissue domains can be matched to precise gene expression patterns. Furthermore, data driven methods can be applied to discover in an unsupervised manner transcriptomic patterns in space. Such patterns correspond to cell-types, microenvironments, or tissue components that allows for novel avenues of research.

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Christopher E. Mason, PhD
Weill Cornell Medicine

The avalanche of easy-to-create genomics data has impacted almost all areas of medicine and science, from cancer patients and microbial diagnostics to molecular monitoring for astronauts in space. Recent technologies and algorithms from our laboratory and others demonstrate that an integrative, cross-kingdom view of patients (precision metagenomics) holds unprecedented biomedical potential to discern risk, improve diagnostic accuracy, and to map both genetic and epigenetic states around the world and in real-time. Finally, these methods and molecular tools work together to guide the most comprehensive, longitudinal, multi-omic view of human astronaut physiology in the NASA Twins Study, which lay the foundation for future long-duration spaceflight, including sequencing, quantifying, and engineering genomes in space.

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 Sohrab Shah, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Sohrab Shah was appointed to MSK in April 2018 as the inaugural Chief of the Computational Oncology Service and is the incumbent of the Nicholls-Biondi Chair. He received a PhD in computer science from the University of British Columbia in 2008 and was appointed as a Principal Investigator to The British Columbia Cancer Agency and the University of British Columbia in 2010 where he developed the roots of his research program. He is a University of British Columbia Killam laureate and a Susan G. Komen Foundation Scholar. His research focuses on cancer evolution, where he uses integrative approaches involving genomics and computational modeling. He has led major projects including the analysis team of the METABRIC consortium, and has published major works in breast and ovarian cancer genomics, including the first description of mutational evolution in a breast cancer patient (Shah et al. Nature 2009), the first mutational landscape of triple negative breast cancers (Shah et al. Nature 2012) and single cell resolution demonstration of clonal evolution in breast cancer xenografts (Eirew et al. Nature 2015).  More recently, he has made seminal contributions to understanding clonal evolution in ovarian cancer and discovered that specific mutational patterns related to foldback inversions in the genomes of ovarian cancers are prognostic in terms of treatment outcomes. Dr. Shah’s recent focus is in deciphering clonal evolution and mutational processes at single cell resolution. His work has been published in Nature, Nature Genetics, Nature Methods, Cell, NEJM, Genome Research, Genome Biology, amongst others.

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Peng Yin, PhD
Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Peng Yin works as an Assistant(2010-2014)/Associate(2014-2016)/Full(2016-) Professor of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School and a Core Faculty Member at Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University (2010-). He is co-founder and director of Ultivue, Inc., an early stage company for digital pathology backed by Arch Ventures. He is also co-founder and director of NuProbe Global, a startup for PCR and NGS based molecular diagnostics backed by prestigious venture funds. His research interests lie at the interface of information science, molecular engineering, and biology. The current focus is to engineer information directed self-assembly of nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) structures and devices, and to exploit such systems to do develop applications in nano-fabrication, imaging, sensing, diagnostics, and therapeutics. He is a recipient of a 2010 NIH Director's New Innovator Award, a 2011 NSF CAREER Award, a 2011 DARPA Young Faculty Award, a 2011 ONR Young Investigator Program Award, a 2013 NIH Director's Transformative Research Award, a 2013 NSF Expedition in Computing Award, a 2014 ACS Synthetic Biology Young Investigator Award, 2014/2015 Finalists for Blavatnik National Award for Young Scientists, 2014/2015 World Economic Forum Young Scientist Awards, a 2017 Tulip Award for DNA Computing and Molecular Programming, and a 2018 NIH Director’s PIONEER award. He graduated from Peking University with B.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Bachelor of Economics in 1998, and from Duke University with M.S. in Molecular Cancer Biology in 2000 and Ph.D. in Computer Science in 2005, and did his postdoc training at CalTech (2005-2009).


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