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POSTERS



Submission # Title Author(s)
1 Anti-inflammatory, immune-modulatory and antioxidant effects of date fruit (Phoenix dactylifera) extract in rats treated with AlCl3 Fawzia Alshubaily and Nadia Osman
2 Diagnosis of Glioma Tumors Using Circulating Cell-Free DNA Vikrant Palande, Dorith Raviv-Shay and Milana Frenkel-Morgenstern
3 Functional and Structutural analysis of the impact of the SNPs in Human Gene SCN8A, In Silion Approach Nosaiba Elkheir M. Ali, Elaf Ibrahim Osman, Rayan S Ali, Sahar E. E. Mohamed, Fedaa Fathalrahman M, Amin M. Ahmed, Sara Shamat, Sanad Abdalbage Mohammed Abdalsadeg Mohammed, Ashraf Osman Ibrahim and Mohamed A. I. Alfaki
4 Comprehensive evaluation of de novo transcriptome assembly programs and their effects on differential gene expression analysis Sufang Wang, Hui Yang, Chen Zhang, Nu Zhang and Michael Gribskov
5 Computational Analysis of Functional Coding/Noncoding Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/Indels) in Human NEUROG1 gene Shimaa Mahalah, Zhoor Hamid, Samah Ibrahim and Shazalia Babiker
6 A comprehensive analysis of small non-coding RNAs in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia samples Leticia G Leon, Fabiënne van Opstal, Steven C. Koetzier, Joyce Schilperoord-Vermeulen, Anton W. Langerak and Stefan J. Erkeland
7 Pilot microbiome profiling of a pharmaceutical factory reveals influence of workers, water, and soil Amal Hamdy, Moamen El-Massry, Mona Kashef, Magdy Amin and Ramy Aziz
8 Using MinION to assist de novo assembly of the Streptococcus agalactiae genome Tamara Hernández-Beeftink, Hector Rodríguez-Pérez, Ana Díaz-De-Usera, Rafaela González-Montelongo, José M Lorenzo-Salazar, Fabián Lorenzo-Díaz and Carlos Flores
11 Whole genome sequence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain SO-1977 isolated from Sudan Sofia Ali
13 Efficient population-scale variant analysis and prioritization with VAPr Adam Mark, Amanda Birmingham, Carlo Mazzafe, Guorong Xu and Kathleen Fisch
16 Detection of signatures of translation and ribonucleoprotein particles in evolutionary conserved regions of long non-coding RNAs. Jorge Ruiz-Orera and M. Mar Albà
18 Sequencing and annotation of resurrection plant H. rhodopensis cp and mt genomes. Zdravka Ivanova, Elena Apostolova, Gergana Zahmanova, Evelina Daskalova, Galina Yahubyan, Ivan Minkov and Vesselin Baev
19 Clustering sRNA-seq data for plant miRNAs de novo annotation. George Minkov, Valentina Toneva, Ivan Minkov and Vesselin Baev
22 Assessing the genomic diversity and selection footprints on dromedary camels using full genome sequencing and genotyping-by-sequence approaches Hussain Bahbahani, Hassan Musa, Eltahir Shuiep, Faisal Al Mathen and Olivier Hanotte
23 A Novel Association between Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) Gene Polymorphisms and Intracranial Aneurysm in the Korean population Bong Jun Kim, Young Mi Kim, Jin Pyeong Jeon and Jae Jun Lee
24 Using RNA-seq and Ribo-seq to understand de novo gene origination in yeast William Blevins, Xavier Messaguer, Jorge Ruiz-Orera, José Luis Villanueva-Cañas, Bernat Blasco-Moreno, Laura Aviñó-Esteban, Guillem Lopez-Grado Salinas, Lorena Espinar, Juana Díez, Lucas Carey and M. Mar Albà
25 Inference of genomic spatial organization from single WGBS samples Emanuele Raineri, Francois Serra, Renee Beekman, Roser Vilarrasa-Blasi, Iñaki Martin-Subero, Marc Marti-Renom, Ivo Gut and Simon Heath
26 Somatic Variant Calling Benchmarking Milan Domazet, Sanja Mijalkovic and Aleksandar Makragic
27 High-throughput characterization of RNA function at single site resolution from mutational interference mapping experiments (MIME) Maureen Smith, Redmond Smyth, Roland Marquet and Max von Kleist
28 Improving target sequence information via de novo assembly of RNA-Seq data from closely related species Julia Söllner, Germán Leparc, Matthias Zwick, Kay Nieselt and Eric Simon
29 Identification of a single nucleotide insertion associated with antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia pseudomallei Véronique Sarilar, Charles Chapus, Marine Schnetterle, Olivier Gorgé, Aïda Boughammoura, Fabienne Neulat-Ripoll, Fabrice Biot and Thomas Poyot
30 Comparison of orthology determination algorithms for RNA-seq phylogenetics Madison H Hansen and Ward C Wheeler
31 Efficient large-scale whole genome alignment computation based on the SuperGenome André Hennig and Kay Nieselt
32 A workflow for accurate neoantigen discovery using NGS data Ognjen Milicevic, Vladimir Kovacevic, Ana Mijalkovic Lazic, Nikola Skundric, Nevena Ilic Raicevic, Milica Kojicic and Jack Digiovanna
33 Next-Generation Sequencing and Network Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Sridhar Hariharaputran
34 Rabix Suite: open-source development project for creating and running computational workflows in Common Workflow Language Bogdan Gavrilovic
35 Capturing changes in transcription factor activity with ATAC-Seq Ignacio Tripodi, Mary Ann Allen and Robin Dowell
37 Homologous recombination deficiency detection in breast cancer using whole exome sequencing TCGA data Marko Petkovic, Aleksandra Stevovic, Gavrilo Andric and Stefan Stojanovic
39 Identifying genomic regions susceptible to systematic sequencing error to improve variant detection Timothy Freeman, Dennis Wang and Jason Harris
41 Simultaneous detection and accurate quantification of coding and non-coding RNAs using a single sequencing reaction Vincent Boivin, Gabrielle Deschamps-Francoeur, Sherif Abou Elela and Michelle Scott
43 Phylogeny-guided genome assembly method for short nucleotide reads from deep sequencing of mixed microbial samples Guangchuang Yu, David Smith, Huachen Zhu, Yi Guan and Tommy Tsan-Yuk Lam
46 Mining of RNA-seq libraries to compute cellular metabolic state Marcelo Rivas-Astroza and Raúl Conejeros
47 Identification of micropeptides by characteristic splicing patterns in RNA-seq data Alexey Mironov, Olga Kalinina, Rory Johnson and Dmitri Pervouchine
50 Identification of epigenomic features linked to 3D interactions using snapshots of chromatin social networks Kat Cheung, Vera Pancaldi, Inmaculada Hernandez-Lopez, Laura Castro, Alfonso Valencia, Manolis Papamichos-Chronakis, Lisa Prendergast and Daniel Rico
51 FASH16S - Fast automated shell based running pipeline for 16S rRNA amplicon NGS data Balamuralikrishna Jayaprakash, Jussi Paananen, Tarja Pitkänen, Pirkka V. Kirjavainen and Martin Täubel
54 Genomic locus-locus interaction networks to identify non-coding pathogenic mutations in immune disorders Maninder Heer, Sophie Hambleton and Daniel Rico
57 METAGENOMIC STUDY OF ENTERIC VIROME IN PROBOSCIS MONKEY Kar Hon Ng, Tommy Tsan-Yuk Lam and Yee Ling Chong
59 Premature termination codon containing transcripts comprise a significant fraction of mRNAs Anna Hakobyan and Maria Nikoghosyan
60 NGS-based miRNA analysis with miRCarta and miRMaster Tobias Fehlmann, Christina Backes, Fabian Kern, Valentina Galata and Andreas Keller
62 Variant annotation pipeline for the identification of splice site SNVs Susanne Kirchen, Dheeraj Bobbili and Patrick May
64 Integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression profiles in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Nicoletta Nuzziello, Arianna Consiglio, Flavio Licciulli, Marta Simone, Giorgio Grillo, Sabino Liuni, Maria Trojano and Maria Liguori
66 Analysis of differential expression of human transmembrane proteins in tumour and normal samples Zsuzsanna Gergely and Gábor Tusnády
67 Reference genome assessment from a population scale perspective: an accurate profile of variability and noise José Carbonell-Caballero, Alicia Amadoz, Roberto Alonso, Marta R. Hidalgo, Cankut Çubuk, David Conesa, Antonio López-Quílez and Joaquín Dopazo
68 Nanopore sequencing on low-biomass microbiota samples: cpn60 UT, full length 16S rRNA gene and whole rrn operon Anna Cusco, Joaquim Viñes and Olga Francino
69 Identification of PAX6-dependent regulatory network during endocrine pancreatic cells and enteroendocrine cells differentiation in zebrafish Arnaud Lavergne, Estefania Tarifeño and Bernard Peers
70 DEVELOPMENT OF A TARGETED NEXT-GENERATION SEQUENCING PANEL FOR DETECTION OF TRANSLOCATIONS, CNAs AND MUTATIONS IN MATURE B CELL NEOPLASMS: COMPARISON WITH CONVENTIONAL GENETIC TECHNIQUES Andrea Gómez Llonín, Anna Puiggros, Benjamín Rodriguez-Santiago, Lara Nonell, Jairo Rodríguez, Heidi Mattlin, Maria Isabel Banchs, Marta Salido, Sílvia Beà, Anna Enjuanes, Mª José Larrayoz, Laura Blanco, Rosa Collado, Margarita Ortega, Esmeralda de La Banda, María Rodríguez-Rivera, Carme Melero, Xavier Calvo, Leonor Arenillas, Eva Gimeno, Blanca Sánchez, Antonio Salar, Lluís Armengol, Ana Ferrer, Lluís Colomo and Blanca Espinet
71 Combining culture-based and culture-independent strategies to understand the gut microbiomes of azo dye-reducing fecal samples Sara Zahran, Marwa Ali-Tammam, Amal Emad Eldin, Ramy Aziz and Abdelgawad Hashem
74 Have you met my new cousins? Fast and accurate pathogen detection in environmental samples János Juhász, Lőrinc S. Pongor, Attila Jády and Balázs Ligeti
76 Sequencing and analysis of Argania spinosa Genome Nour El Houda Azza, Stacy Ciufo, Tatiana Tatusova, M. Gonzalo Claros, Abdelhamid El Mousadik and Hassan Ghazal
78 Linkage disequilibrium maps to guide contig ordering in genome assembly Reuben Pengelly and Andrew Collins
79 OneD: increasing reproducibility of Hi-C samples with abnormal karyotypes Enrique Vidal, François Le Dily, Javier Quilez, Ralph Stadhouders, Yasmina Cuartero, Thomas Graf, Marc A Marti-Renom, Miguel Beato and Guillaume J Filion
80 Second generation molecular subgrouping of medulloblastoma: towards a working consensus of Group 3/4 subtypes Tanvi Sharma, Edward C. Shwalbe, Daniel Williamson, Volker Hovestadt, Lukas Chavez, Marcel Kool, Paul A. Northcott, Stefan M.Pfister and Steven C.Clifford
81 Sequencing of CynD from Bacillus pumilus isolated in Peru revelated a intraspecies variable nucleotide sequences but conserved amino acid sequences. David Pabon, Roberto Pineda, Mauro Quiñones and Santiago Justo
82 A new method to phase de novo mutations in trios Layal Yasin, Carolin Walter, Julia Taeubner, Martin Dugas, Arndt Borkhardt and Michaela Kuhlen
84 nextPARS: Parallel probing of RNA structures in Illumina Ester Saus, Jesse Willis, Leszek P. Pryszcz, Ahmed Hafez, Carlos Llorens, Heinz Himmelbauer and Toni Gabaldón
89 SNuPy an online platform that empowers genetic scientists to unravel disease‑causing variants from intricate genotype studies Sebastian Ginzel, Michael Gombert, Ute Fischer, Arndt Borkhardt and Ralf Thiele
90 Pangenomics: efficient and scalable genome analysis Sandra Smit, Siavash Sheikhizadeh Anari, Eef Jonkheer and Dick de Ridder
92 Gene prioritization, communality analysis, networking, and metabolic integrated pathway to better understand breast cancer pathogenesis (POSTER) Andrés López-Cortés, César Paz-Y-Miño, Alejandro Cabrera-Andrade, Santiago Guerrero, Stephen J Barigye, Cristian R Munteanu, Humberto González-Díaz, Alejandro Pazos-Sierra, Yunierkis Pérez-Castillo and Eduardo Tejera
93 Pangenomic applications in plants and pathogens Eef Jonkheer, Sandra Smit, Theo van der Lee, Siavash Sheikhizadeh Anari and Dick de Ridder
94 Identification of microRNAs as modulators of gene expression during sexual differentiation in fish under high-temperature effects. Javier Moraleda, Julien Bobe, Francesc Piferrer and Laia Ribas
95 Length matters: Upgrading genome assemblies with Nanopore sequencing Tyler Alioto, Fernando Cruz, Jèssica Gómez Garrido, Pere Arús and Miodrag Grbic
96 Benchmarking Project of Bisulfite Sequencing Workflows Pavlo Lutsik, Reka Toth, Christoph Plass and Yassen Assenov
97 Scalable and Reproducible NGS Pipelines with epiCWL Kersten Breuer, Pavlo Lutsik, Yoann Pageaud, Reka Toth, Christoph Plass and Yassen Assenov
98 A custom bioinformatics analysis pipeline for the stratification of admixed populations and prioritisation of rare single nucleotide variants Nada Salem, Ashraf Dallol, Adel Abuzenadeh, Emmanouil Dermitzakis and Hend Nour Eldin
99 Brain gene expression response to pesticide exposure indicates effects on cognition. Yannick Wurm, Isaabel Fletcher, Thomas Joe Colgan, Andres Arce and Richard Gill
100 Degenerative expansion of a young social chromosome supergene Eckart Stolle, Rodrigo Pracana and Yannick Wurm
102 Whole Genome Sequencing to Track the Origin and Transmission of Tuberculosis in Low Prevalence Setting of Australia Sanjay S. Gautam, Micheál Mac Aogáin, Louise A. Cooley, Greg Haug, Janet A. Fyfe, Maria Globan, Ronan F. O’Toole

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS



Submission # Title Author(s)
9 A 10.000 sample overview of cancer driver events Eduard Porta
10 Predicting disease-causing variant combinations accurately Sofia Papadimitriou, Andrea Gazzo, Nassim Versbraegen, Charlotte Nachtegael, Jan Aerts, Yves Moreau, Sonia Van Dooren, Ann Nowé, Guillaume Smits and Tom Lenaerts
12 Toward decoding complete human immunome. Assemble recombined T and B cell receptor sequences across 50000 individuals Serghei Mangul, University of California, Los Angeles
Steven Schffert, Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection, Stanford University and Division of Biomedical Informatics Center Department of Medicine, Stanford University
Purvesh Khatri, Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection, Stanford University and Division of Biomedical Informatics Center Department of Medicine, Stanford University
15 Characterizing the microbiome in factory ingredient samples using metatranscriptome deep sequencing data Kristen Beck, Niina Haiminen, David Chambliss, Stefan Edlund, Mark Kunitomi, Robert Baker, Peter Markwell, Matthew Davis, Laxmi Parida, Robert Prill, Carol Huang, Nguyet Kong, Ban Kawas, Trey Marlowe, Steve Binder, Geraud Dubois, James Kaufman and Bart Weimer
17 Fast and sensitive protein sequence search, clustering and assembly tools for the analysis of massive metagenomics datasets Martin Steinegger and Johannes Soeding
20 Comprehensive sequencing of the myocilin gene in a selected cohort of primary open-angle glaucoma patients Luke O'Gorman, Angela Cree, Daniel Ward, Helen Griffiths, Jay Self, Sarah Ennis, Andrew Lotery and Jane Gibson
21 Identification and validation of novel and annotated LncRNAs in canine B-cell lymphoma by RNA-Seq Luciano Cascione, Antonella Mensi, Serena Ferraresso, Laura Marconato, Diana Giannuzzi, Francesco Bertoni, Rosalba Giugno and Luca Aresu
36 bigSCale: An Analytical Framework for Big-Scale Single-Cell Data Giovanni Iacono, Elisabetta Mereu, Amy Guillaumet-Adkins, Roser Corominas, Ivon Cuscó, Gustavo Rodríguez-Esteban, Marta Gut, Luis Alberto Pérez-Jurado, Ivo Gut and Holger Heyn
40 Study of genome evolution among traditional bakery yeasts in relation to domestication Colin Tinsley, Veronique Sarilar, Sandrine Pinos, Jacek Kominec, Chris Hittinger, Delphine Sicard and Serge Casaregola
42 Genomic characterisation and vulnerabilities of two transmissible cancers in Tasmanian devils Maximilian Stammnitz, Tim Coorens, Kevin Gori, Dane Hayes, Beiyuan Fu, Tracy Wang, Daniel Martin-Herranz, Ludmil Alexandrov, Adrian Baez-Ortega, Syd Barthorpe, Alexandra Beck, Francesca Giordano, Graeme Knowles, Young Mi Kwon, George Hall, Stacey Price, Ruth Pye, Jose Tubio, Hannah Siddle, Sukhwinder Singh Sohal, Gregory Woods, Ultan McDermott, Fengtang Yang, Mathew Garnett, Zemin Ning and Elizabeth Murchison
44 A Powerful Bayesian Test for Equality of Means in High Dimensions Roger Zoh, Abhra Sarkar, Raymond J. Carroll and Bani K. Mallick
45 Single cell systems immunology of viral specific B cells and CD8+ T cells Simone Rizzetto, Auda Eltahla, David Koppstein, Mehdi Rasoli Pirozyan, Curtis Cai, Elizabeth Keoshkerian, Bing-Ru Wu, Mandeep Singh, Joanne Reed, Christopher Goodnow, Andrew Lloyd, Rowena Bull and Fabio Luciani
48 3D determinants of gene expression variability Simone Ecker, Alfonso Valencia and Vera Pancaldi
49 NGS-based resequencing and reannotation of the Trypanosoma congolense genome and trancriptome Marcin Jąkalski, Keisuke Suganuma, Yutaka Suzuki, Wojciech Makałowski, Noboru Inoue and Junya Yamagishi
52 Stratified co-morbidity networks: Inferring patient-specific comorbidities from transcriptomic data Jon Sánchez-Valle, Vera Pancaldi and Alfonso Valencia
53 Sweepstake evolution revealed by population-genetic analysis of copy-number alterations in single genomes of breast cancer Daniel A Vasco, Mamoru Kato, Ryuichi Sugino, Daichi Narushima and Alexander Krasnitz
55 Genome diversity and evolution in a transmissible cancer Adrian Baez-Ortega, Andrea Strakova, Kevin Gori and Elizabeth Murchison
56 High quality genome of a Norwegian reindeer using 10X Genomics Montserrat Torres-Oliva, Marc Höppner, Jarl Andreas Anmarkrud, Sandra May, Sören Franzenburg, Tom Hemming Karlsen and Andre Franke
58 Reference-free reconstruction and error correction of transcriptomes from Nanopore long-read sequencing Ivan de La Rubia, Joel Indi and Eduardo Eyras
61 Network-based smoothing of somatic mutations improves patient classification from sparse genetic data Luca Giudice, Shraddha  Pai, Trey Ideker, Gary Bader and Rosalba Giugno
63 GenePy: a gene score for next generation sequencing data modelling Enrico Mossotto, Benjamin MacArthur and Sarah Ennis
65 Mutated Tumor Suppressors Follow Oncogenes Profile by the Gene Hypermethylation of Partners in the Protein Interaction Networks Somnath Tagore, Rajesh Detroja and Milana Frenkel-Morgenstern
72 Corrections for asymmetry in high-throughput sequencing datasets applied to a meta-transcriptome dataset Greg Gloor, Jean Megan Macklaim and Jia Rong Wu
73 Understanding regulation of alternative splicing through RNA binding proteins Dmitry Svetlichnyy, Daria Romanovskaya and Dmitri Pervouchine
75 Measuring the mappability spectrum of reference genome assemblies Zachary Stephens and Ravishankar Iyer
77 Phenotype-driven variant prioritization significantly improves over impact and prevalence scores in a large-scale analysis of 1,963 cases of Mendelian disease diagnostics by whole-genome sequencing Francisco De La Vega, Melanie Babcock, Edward Kiruluta, Mark Yandell and Martin Reese
83 Detection of radiation-Induced alterations in the transcriptome and Exome of human gingiva fibroblasts Neetika Nath, Harry Scherthan, Tim Kacprowski, Jessica Müller, Lars R. Jensen, Lars Kaderali, Matthias Port and Andreas W. Kuss
85 Systematic pan-cancer analysis of somatic allele frequency Liam Spurr, Paula Restrepo, Mercedeh Movassagh, Nawaf Alomran, Li Muzi and Anelia Horvath
86 Weighted correlation network analysis and transcriptome dynamics during early gonadal differentiation of the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Núria Sánchez-Baizán, Laia Ribas and Francesc Piferrer
87 Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Cancer Research: a Never-ending Battle Santiago Guerrero, Andres López-Cortés, Alberto Indacochea, Jennyfer M. García-Cárdenas, Ana Karina Zambrano, Alejandro Cabrera-Andrade, Patricia Guevara-Ramírez, Diana Abigail González, Paola E. Leone and César Paz-Y-Miño
88 LATE BREAKING SUBMISSION: Dumpster diving in RNA-sequencing to find the source of 1 trillion reads across diverse adult human tissues Serghei Mangul
91 The challenges of designing a benchmark strategy for bioinformatics pipelines in the identification of Antimicrobial Resistance determinants using next generation sequencing technologies Alexandre Angers, Mauro Petrillo and Guy Van den Eede
101 Towards novel signalling functions of mobile mRNAs Federico Apelt, Eleftheria Saplaoura, Valentina Perrera, Vincent Colot and Friedrich Kragler

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PROGRAM SCHEDULE



Click here to download (pdf)

Links within this page:
Monday, Apr 9 | Tuesday, Apr 10 | Wednesday, Apr 11
Program and location are subject to change. Please check back often for updates.


Monday - Day 1 - April 9, 2018
Go directly to: Tuesday, April 10 | Wednesday, Apr 11
Start
Time
End
Time
Event
08:30 09:00 Registration
09:00 09:15 Welcome by Alfonso Valencia, BSC, Barcelona, ES and ISCB past president
09:15 09:20 Opening Address by Núria López-Bigas, IRB, Barcelona, ES
09:20 10:05 Keynote 1: Francesca D. Ciccarelli, King's College London, UK
"Systems biology to rebuild cancer evolution and identify new cancer genes"
Session 1: 10:05 - 12:350: Cancer Genomics
(chair: Núria López-Bigas)
    OP1 - A 10.000 sample overview of cancer driver events”
Eduard Porta,
Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, Barcelona, ES
    OP2 - “Systematic pan-cancer analysis of somatic allele frequency”
Anelia Horvath,
George Washington University, USA
10:45 11:15 Coffee Break
    OP3 – “Sweepstake evolution revealed by population-genetic analysis of copy-number alterations in single genomes of breast cancer”
Daniel A Vasco,
Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine, LU
    OP4 – “Mutated Tumor Suppressors Follow Oncogenes Profile by the Gene Hypermethylation of Partners in the Protein Interaction Networks”
Somnath Tagore,
Bar-Ilan University, IL
    OP5 – “Network-based smoothing of somatic mutations improves patient classification from sparse genetic data”
Rosalba Giugno,
Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, IT
    OP6 – “Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Cancer Research: a Never-ending Battle”
Santiago Guerrero,
Centro de Investigación Genética y Genómica, EC
12:35 14:00 Lunch and Poster Viewing
14:00 14:05 Introduction by Cedric Notredame, Center for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona, ES
14:05 14:450 Keynote 2: Nicholas Luscombe, The Francis Crick Institute, UK

Session 2: 14:50 - 18:40: Genetics and Transcriptomics
(chair: Cedric Notredame)
    OP07 – “Predicting disease-causing variant combinations accurately”
Tom Lenaerts,
Universite Libre de Bruxelles, BE
    OP08 – “Comprehensive sequencing of the myocilin gene in a selected cohort of primary open-angle glaucoma patients”
Luke O'Gorman,
University of Southampton, UK
    OP09 – “GenePy: a gene score for next generation sequencing data modelling”
Enrico Mossotto,
University of Southampton, UK
    OP10 – “Phenotype-driven variant prioritization significantly improves over impact and prevalence scores in a large-scale analysis of 1,963 cases of Mendelian disease diagnostics by whole-genome sequencing”
Francisco De La Vega, Stanford University, USA
    OP11 – “Dumpster diving in RNA-sequencing to find the source of 1 trillion reads across diverse adult human tissues”
Serghei Mangul,
University of California, Los Angeles, USA
16:30 17:00 Coffee break
    OP12 – “Identification and validation of novel and annotated LncRNAs in canine B-cell lymphoma by RNA-Seq”
Rosalba Giugno,
Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, IT
    OP13 – “Towards novel signalling functions of mobile mRNAs”
Federico Apelt,
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, DE
    OP14 – “Understanding regulation of alternative splicing through RNA binding proteins”
Dmitri Pervouchine,
Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, RU
    OP15 – “Stratified co-morbidity networks: Inferring patient-specific comorbidities from transcriptomic data”
Vera Pancaldi,
Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, Barcelona, ES
    OP16 – “bigSCale: An Analytical Framework for Big-Scale Single-Cell Data”
Giovanni Icano,
CRG-CNAG, Barcelona, ES
18:40   Networking and Poster Presentations
20:00   Conference Dinner. Xiroi Ca la Nuri. Address: Passeig Marítim de la Nova Icària, 38.


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Tuesday - Day 2 - April 10, 2018
Go directly to: Monday, April 9 | Wednesday, Apr 11
Start
Time
End
Time
Event
08:45 09:00 Morning Welcome and Introduction
9:00 9:05 Introduction by Alfonso Valencia, BSC, Barcelona, ES
09:05 09:50 Keynote 3: Nick Loman, University of Birmingham, UK
"A sequencing singularity of infection disease?"
Session 3: 09:50 - 13:00: Transcriptomics (II) and Model Organisms
(chair: Alfonso Valencia)
    OP17 – “Reference-free reconstruction and error correction of transcriptomes from Nanopore long-read sequencing”
Eduardo Eyras,
Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, ES
    OP18 – “3D determinants of gene expression variability”
Vera Pancaldi,
Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, Barcelona, Spain
10:30 11:00 Coffee Break
    OP19 – “Study of genome evolution among traditional bakery yeasts in relation to domestication”
Colin Tinsley, Inra, France
    OP20 – “Weighted correlation network analysis and transcriptome dynamics during early gonadal differentiation of the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)”
Núria Sánchez-Baizán,
Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, ES
    OP21 – “NGS-based resequencing and reannotation of the Trypanosoma congolense genome and trancriptome”
Marcin Jąkalski,
Department of Plant Taxonomy and Nature Conservation, University of Gdańsk, PL
    OP22 – “High quality genome of a Norwegian reindeer using 10X Genomics”
Montserrat Torres-Oliva,
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Christian-Albrechts-University,
Kiel, DE
    OP23 – “Genomic characterisation and vulnerabilities of two transmissible cancers in Tasmanian devils”
Maximilian Stammnitz,
University of Cambridge, UK
    OP24 – “Genome diversity and evolution in a transmissible cancer”
Adrian Baez-Ortega,
Transmissible Cancer Group, University of Cambridge, UK
13:00 14:00 Lunch and Poster Viewing
Session 4: 14:00 - 16:40: Multi-Omics & Metagenomics
(chair: Francisco De La Vega)
    OP25 – “Single cell systems immunology of viral specific B cells and CD8+ T cells”
Simone Rizzetto,
School of Medical Science, UNSW, AU
    OP26 – “Toward decoding complete human immunome. Assemble recombined T and B cell receptor sequences across 50,000 individuals”
Serghei Mangul, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
    OP27 – “Detection of radiation-Induced alterations in the transcriptome and Exome of human gingiva fibroblasts”
Neetika Nath,
University Medicine Greifswald, DE
    OP28 – “Corrections for asymmetry in high-throughput sequencing datasets applied to a meta-transcriptome dataset”
Greg Gloor
, U. Western Ontario, CA
    OP29 – “Fast and sensitive protein sequence search, clustering and assembly tools for the analysis of massive metagenomics datasets”
Martin Steinegger, Max-Planck-Institute, DE
15:40 16:00 Coffee Break
    OP30 – “Characterizing the microbiome in factory ingredient samples using metatranscriptome deep sequencing data”
Kristen Beck,
IBM, USA
    OP31 – “The challenges of designing a benchmark strategy for bioinformatics pipelines in the identification of Antimicrobial Resistance determinants using next generation sequencing technologies”
Alexandre Angers,
Joint Research Centre, European Commission, IT
16:40 16:45 Introduction by Francisco De La Vega, Stanford University, USA
16:45 17:25 Keynote 3: Ami Bhatt, Stanfod University, USA
"Translating metagenomics"
17:25   Awards and closing remarks


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Wednesday - Day 3 - April 11, 2018
Go directly to: Monday, April 9 | Tuesday, April 10
Start
Time
End
Time
Event
Workshop: 09:00 - 16:00  Compositionally Appropriate Analysis of Transcriptome, Metagenome, and Microbiome Datasets
Instructors:  Greg Gloor, Jean Macklaim, and Ionas Erb
12:00 13:00 Lunch

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
Deadline 29 January 2018
Late Breaking Deadline 21 February 2018



NGS 2018 invites the submission of abstracts* describing either original, unpublished research or research that has been published recently in a high-impact journal.  Selection for presentation as either an oral presentation or a poster will be based on the review of extended abstracts. Authors who submit original, unpublished work selected for presentation at the conference may be invited to submit a full-length paper or extended abstract with full data for peer-review to published** in the ISCB Community Journal, ISCB NGS-BARCELONA channel. All posters will also be invited to submit in poster format to the ISCB NGS-BARCELONA channel.

The program will address a wide range of topics such as genome assembly, variant characterization and analysis, gene expression, population history, and disease.  Sizeable space is dedicated to submission-based presentations from the topics listed below.

Topics include:

  • State of the art technologies, and technologies under development
  • Novel software and algorithms
  • Reproducibility
  • Novel applications of NGS technologies in genomics and biology
  • Genomic and transcriptomic analyses, including RNA analysis, transcription factor binding sites profiling, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, copy number variation, genotyping, RNA structure, dynamics of transcription and translation, etc.
  • Research breakthroughs based on exhaustive applications of NGS.
  • Clinical and translational applications
  • Applications to agriculture and biotechnology
  • Societal and economic implications: forensic law, sociology research, history, etc.
  • Economical impacts


Plan to submit your research to this engaging conference!
*
    Abstract text limited to 300 words
**
    Authors are responsible for publishing fees. ISCB members receive a 20% discount.

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SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS JANUARY 29, 2018!
LATE BREAKING SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS FEBRUARY 21, 2018!
For submission support, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Abstracts received before the due date will be considered for oral presentations and/or poster presentations. If your abstract is accepted, it will be included in an abstract booklet that will be distributed to all conference participants. Accepted original research abstracts will also be invited to publish in the ISCB Community Journal at the author's’ expense.

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How to Submit your Abstract

Please use this link to EasyChair to submit your abstract. You will be asked to provide information about yourself and your coauthors, including name, e-mail address, and affiliation. Please check one box for corresponding author to indicate who would be speaking or would be primarily responsible for your poster. You will also be asked to provide an abstract title, the text of your abstract, and keywords.


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NGS Post-Conference Workshop
April 11, 2018
9am - 4pm

Registration is required. Limited capacity.


Registration Fees

  • ISCB Member/CRG - € 35
  • Nonmember - € 55

Compositionally Appropriate Analysis of Transcriptome, Metagenome, and Microbiome Datasets

Organizers:
Greg Gloor is a Professor of Biochemistry at The University of Western Ontario. He is one of the pioneers in using compositional data analysis to analyze HTS datasets. He is the maintainer of the ALDEx2 R package on Bioconductor used for differential relative abundance analysis. He has published original research, methods papers, and reviews that use compositional data analysis methods to interpret HTS datasets using transcriptome, microbiome and meta-transcriptome datasets (Bian et al.; Fernandes et al., 2013, 2014; Gloor and Reid, 2016; Gloor et al., 2016a, 2017, 2016b, 2016c; Goneau et al., 2015; Macklaim et al., 2013; McMillan et al., 2015; Wolfs et al., 2016). He has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in computational biology for almost two decades, and has won awards from both student groups and faculty-wide competitions.

Ionas Erb is a PDF and Bioinformatician at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona. He is an active developer of tools to determine compositional association and is a contributor to the propr R package on CRAN used to explore correlation in a compositionally appropriate manner (Erb and Notredame, 2016; Erb et al., 2017; Quinn et al., 2017a).

Description:
There is increasing awareness that datasets generated by high throughput sequencing are compositional leading to both false positive and false negative inference. This workshop will show the dangers of ignoring the compositional nature of the data, and provide appropriate tools for compositional analysis at all stages of analysis. We will teach participants the toolset needed to conduct exploratory data analysis (biplots and clustering), correlation (propr) and differential relative abundance (ALDEx2) in a compositionally appropriate manner.

Learning Objectives:
1) Be able to identify when biological datasets are compositional, and understand the root problems that cause problems when interrogating compositional datasets.
2) Understand why HTS data should be analyzed in a compositionally-appropriate framework.
3) Know how to install, use and interpret the output from the basic HTS compositional toolkit that consists of
compositional biplots, the propr R package and the ALDEx2 R package.
4) Have a frame of reference for more complex compositional tools such as philr and concepts such as b-association a
nd balance dendrograms.

Audience Level:
The intended audience for this session is bioinformaticians or computational biologists who use high throughput sequencing with experimental designs that include tag sequencing (eg. 16S rRNA gene sequencing), metagenomics, transcriptomics or meta-transcriptomics.
This is not intended to be an introduction to R for bioinformaticians: attendees should be relatively proficient with R, either using RStudio, or on the command line and should have a plain text editor available. Attendees will use R markdown documents to keep track of their work, and templates will be provided for use. Attendees will be expected to have a laptop with R installed and the following packages and their dependencies: propr (CRAN), ALDEx2 (Bioconductor), omicplotR (Bioconductor), zCompositions (CRAN). Attendees are encouraged to bring their own datasets for analysis, but should be aware that only pairwise (i.e., two condition) experiments will be demonstrated.
Compositional concepts will be at an introductoryintermediate level suitable for participants of any background, but will be more intuitive to those with a grounding in probability and linear algebra.
The practical aspects will be at an intermediate level, suitable for participants with pre-exisiting competency in R.
Attendance should be capped at approximately 40 participants. 
ATTENDEES MUST BRING THEIR OWN LAPTOP.

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WELCOME TO NGS 2018!



Hosted by the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) and the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), the Next Generation Sequencing Conference 2018 (NGS 2018) is a dedicated meeting on cutting-edge approaches to the processing and analysis of Next Generation Sequencing data. The goal of this conference is to bring together bioinformatics researchers and biologists facing new high-throughput sequencing challenges. The conference will feature presentations showing how current platforms can be used to address key biological questions and on the current state of the art for data analysis. Emphasis will also be placed on emerging and future trends in high-throughput sequencing and the associated computational challenges.


Topics include:

  • Single cell genomics and transcriptomics
  • Genome structure and population genomics
  • State of the art sequencing technologies, and technologies under development
  • Novel applications of NGS technologies in genomics and biology
  • Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression
  • Epigenetics and chromatin structure
  • Research breakthroughs based on exhaustive applications of NGS
  • Clinical and translational applications
  • Applications to agriculture and biotechnology
  • Societal and economic implications: forensic law, sociology research, history, etc.


The conference will also aim to encompass the associated computational challenges:

  • Novel algorithms, methods and pipelines
  • Comparative benchmarks of methods
  • Hardware developments specific to NGSHigh performance computing in NGS
  • Computation in portable NGS devices, micro- and nano-NGS devices
  • Computation during data acquisition
  • Software implementations to enable NGS applications


The submission of both original and previously published research will be accepted for either oral or poster presentation. Plan to submit your research to this engaging conference! Providers of software or technology as also encouraged to participate in the conference.

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Keynote Speakers

 

Ami Bhatt
Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Divisions of Hematology and BMT
Stanford University

 Ami Bhatt  Francesca Ciccarelli

 

Francesca Ciccarelli
Reader in Genomics and Bioinformatics
King's College London

 

Nick Loman
School of Biosciences
University of Birmingham

 Nick Loman  Micholas Luscombe

 

Nicholas Luscombe
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Laboratory
The Francis Crick Institute


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Conference Chairs

Núria López-Bigas, PhD


Núria López-Bigas, PhD
ICREA Research Professor
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)











Francisco M. De La Vega, D.Sc.

Senior Vice President of Genomics, Fabric Genomics Inc.
Adjunct Professor, Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University School of Medicine


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Conference Sponsors

Illumina       

       


Media Partner

Bioinformatics Barcelona Association (BIB)


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PROGRAM SCHEDULE


Please check back for updates.



 

REGISTER



 
Click here to register for NGS 2018

CRG-CNAG Members Click Here


EARLY REGISTRATION: Through 14 March 2018
MEMBERS:
ISCB Member/CRG-CNAG Members €225.00
ISCB Students Members and CRG-CNAG Members Students (with i.d.) €125.00
ISCB Post-Doc Members and CRG-CNAG Members Post-Doc €195.00
Post Conference Workshop €35.00
NON- MEMBERS:
Non- Member €395.00
Students - nonmember €275.00
Post-Doc - nonmember €345.00
Non-member Post Conference Workshop €55.00
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REGULAR REGISTRATION: 15 March - 2 April 2017
MEMBERS:
ISCB Member/CRG-CNAG Members €275.00
ISCB Students Members and CRG-CNAG Members Students (with i.d.) €175.00
ISCB Post-Doc Members and CRG-CNAG Members Post-Doc €245.00
NON- MEMBERS:
Non- Member €445.00
Students - nonmember €325.00
Post-Doc - nonmember €395.00
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ONSITE REGISTRATION
MEMBERS:
ISCB Member/CRG-CNAG Members €375.00
ISCB Students Members and CRG-CNAG Members Students (with i.d.) €275.00
ISCB Post-Doc Members and CRG-CNAG Members Post-Doc €345.00
NON- MEMBERS:
Non- Member €545.00
Students - nonmember €425.00
Post-Doc - nonmember €495.00

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ISCB MEMBERSHIP
(ISCB Membership Fee Chart available here)

ISCB MEMBERS: If you are a current member of ISCB, you must use the email address associated with your ISCB membership in order to register at the discounted member rates through the online system. If you do not know the email address you used to register with ISCB, please send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. before proceeding with conference registration.

NONMEMBERS OF ISCB: Nonmembers will be able to join ISCB through the online conference registration system and immediately receive member rates for NGS 2018. You can either join when you register for the conference or you can join the ISCB here and then immediately register for the conference at the member rates.

ISCB MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL: If your ISCB membership is not current or will expire on or before April 9, 2018 you will be offered an opportunity to renew your membership as part of your registration fees through the online system.

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REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS
To register via fax or mail, please complete the online registration form and choose the non-credit card payment option. You can then print out a paper invoice and fax it to +1-619-374-2890 or send it to the address below. To pay by credit card please include the invoice along with this credit card authorization form (click here for PDF form) and either fax it or mail it to the address below. (ISCB accepts American Express, Mastercard, and Visa only.) 

To pay by check make your payment payable (EUR€) to the International Society for Computational Biology and mail it with a copy of your invoice to: 

NGS 2018 Registration 
c/o Belinda Hanson - ISCB
9650 Rockville Pike 
Bethesda, MD 20814

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PAYMENT OPTIONS
All conference fees for the NGS 2018 Conference are charged in Euros. 

Credit cards
 

The following credit cards are accepted for registration: American Express, MasterCard, and Visa. For offline payment please use this form (.pdf).

Wire Funds

If requesting to pay via wire (an additional €25) please email:
Bel Hanson This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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VISA INVITATION LETTERS
Invitation letters required for visa applications will be sent with your confirmation after registration and full payment have been received. You must be registered and paid-in-full for the conference in order to receive an invitation letter.

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CANCELLATION POLICY

Cancellation Policy: Request for registration cancellation must be made in writing and emailed to ISCB Registration Office, e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. All refunds will be processed following the conference. Refunds will be made in accordance with the following schedule:

  • Cancellations received by March 16, 2018 will receive a 50% refund.
  • No refund of fees will be made after March 16, 2018.

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Questions about registration

For questions about your registration please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
























































































































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Exclusively for members

  • Member Discount

    ISCB Members enjoy discounts on conference registration (up to $150), journal subscriptions, book (25% off), and job center postings (free).

  • Why Belong

    Connecting, Collaborating, Training, the Lifeblood of Science. ISCB, the professional society for computational biology!

     

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